Click for Academy of Management home page

A A A
Academy of Management

Special Issues Coming from AMLE!

Learning and Education Strategies for Scholarly Impact:
Influencing Regulation, Policy and Society through Research

Guest Editors
Usha C. V. Haley, Wichita State University (editorial contact: usha.haley@wichita.edu)
Sir Cary L. Cooper, University of Manchester
Andrew J. Hoffman, University of Michigan
Tyrone S. Pitsis, Durham University
Danna Greenberg, Babson College
Paul Hibbert, University of St. Andrews

We define scholarly impact as an “auditable or recordable occasion of influence” arising out of research (Haley, Page, Pitsis, Rivas and Yu, 2017); this special issue will explore influence through research on communities that include not just scholars, but also other external and internal stakeholders such as regulators, policymakers, managers, students and society at large.

For more information...

Initial submissions should be received by May 31, 2021
Scheduled for Publication: September 2022

New Histories of Business Schools and How They May Inspire New Futures

Guest Editors
Patricia Genoe McLaren, Wilfrid Laurier University
JC Spender, Kozminski University
Stephen Cummings, Victoria University of Wellington
Ellen O’Connor, Dominican University of California
Christina Lubinski, Copenhagen Business School
Todd Bridgman, Victoria University of Wellington
Gabrielle Durepos, Mount Saint Vincent University (Canada)

We might do well to re-examine what we are doing and show the executive judgment and courage necessary to implement radical change (Khurana & Spender 2012: 636).

Business schools are the institutional locus of management learning and education. In recent years, we have gained a greater understanding of how their structures, processes, and power dynamics influence pedagogy and curricula, management theory and research, faculty, students, graduates and society more broadly. We are also witnessing growing research into, and discussion about, the relative lack of innovation in management theory development, research, pedagogy, and curricula (Alvesson & Sandberg, 2012). While there have been a small number of inspirational works that have sought to push us towards changing business schools (Augier and March, 2011; Hassard, 2012; Khurana 2007; Spender, 2016), they have not yet spurred the change we might have hoped for.

For more information...

Special Issue Video and Transcript

Initial submissions should be received by March 31, 2020
Scheduled for Publication: June 2021

Rationality and Management Learning and Education: Reconceiving and Reinvigorating the Role of Reason in Managerial Practice

Guest Editors
Morten Sørensen Thaning, Copenhagen Business School
Mike Zundel, University of Liverpool
Alessia Contu, University of Massachusetts, Boston
Russ Vince, University of Bath
Robin Holt, Copenhagen Business School

This special issue raises three grounding questions for management learning and education:

  1. In what sense is rational action the aim for management learning and education?
  2. How do we cultivate rational managers and workplaces?
  3. In studying management learning and education, what alternative conceptions of rationality emerge?

For more information...

Initial submissions should be received by June 30, 2019
Scheduled for Publication: September 2020

Rhythms of Academic Life: Frost and Taylor 20 Years on

Guest Editors
Jon Billsberry, Deakin University
Michael Cohen, Deakin University
Tine Köhler, University of Melbourne
Micheal Stratton, University of North Carolina Asheville
Susan Taylor, University of Maryland at College Park

About 20 years ago, this seminal text on this subject was published. More than 50 management scholars published personal reflections on a broad range of career-related issues in this volume. We work in changing times with no great certainty about the future of our roles. The rhythm of our jobs seems markedly different to just a few years ago.

The purpose of this special issue is to explore the ways in which management academic jobs and careers are changing, the reasons for these changes, and the impact that these changes will have in the future. We want to explore these matters theoretically and empirically, and to encourage perspectives from different philosophies, designs, and approaches. Consequently, we encourage both conceptual and empirical submissions that address the jobs and careers of management educators and have no preconceptions about suitable ontologies or epistemologies.

Initial submissions should be received by September 1, 2017
Scheduled for Publication: June 2019

Academy of Management
Member Services
Join|Renew|Login
Academy of Management
Online Opportunities
Advertising
Academy of Management
Recognition
Awards|Leadership